Dr. William Ball, MD

Professor of Radiology

Dr. William Ball, MD

William Ball, M.D., received his undergraduate degree in biochemistry from Louisiana State University. He is a graduate of Tulane Medical School, and is board certified in both pediatrics and radiology with added certification in Neuroradiology. He joined the faculty in Radiology at CCHMC in 1984, and became Chief of Section in Pediatric Neuroradiology, a position he held from 1988 - 2001. In 1993, Dr. Ball developed and created the Imaging Research Center (IRC) at CCHMC and served as its Director from April 1993 - 2002. As a researcher, Dr. Ball has contributed over 123 scientific contributions to literature, 11 book chapters and was the Editor of a complete text Pediatric Neuroradiology that is still in publication today. He is currently a tenured Professor in Biomedical Engineering, Radiology and Pediatrics. In 2001, Dr. Ball became chair of the newly formed Department of Biomedical Engineering (UCBME) at UC. Under his direction, UCBME has grown to 13 full time faculty, over 200 undergraduate students and 45 graduate students. Undergraduate tracks include biomechanics and medical product design. Research programs in UCBME focus on medical imaging, reparative medicine, biomechanics, nanomedicine and bioinformatics. In 2008, Dr. Ball returned to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital as full-time Attending Staff Neuroradiologist.

Dr. Alan Brody, MD

Associate Director of Radiology Research, Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics

Dr. Alan Brody, MD

After receiving his degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, Alan S. Brody, MD, did his internship at San Francisco General Hospital. He then completed Pediatric and Radiology Residencies at the University of California in San Francisco. Dr. Brody is board-certified in both Pediatrics and Radiology. Dr. Brody completed his Pediatric Radiology Fellowship at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in 1987. From 1987-1993, he worked at the Children's Hospital of Buffalo, where he was director of CT services. In 1993, Dr. Brody assumed the position of Chief of Pediatric Radiology at St. Joseph's Hospital in Phoenix, AZ. In 1995, Dr. Brody joined the Department of Radiology at Cincinnati Children's.

Dr. Kim M. Cecil, PhD

Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, Neuroscience and Environmental Health

Dr. Kim M. Cecil, PhD

Kim M. Cecil, PhD, received her BS degree from Kentucky Wesleyan College and her MS and PhD degrees from Vanderbilt University. After a post-doctoral fellowship in MR spectroscopy and imaging at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Cecil joined the Radiology Department and the Imaging Research Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in 1998. She serves as a researcher and clinical MR spectroscopist. In 2000, Kim M. Cecil, PhD, Antonius deGrauw, MD, PhD and Gajja Salomons, PhD, discovered creatine transporter deficiency syndrome, a genetic disorder caused by mutations in the creatine transporter gene (SLC6A8). Male patients demonstrate a significant reduction or absence of creatine in the brain, as indicated by MR spectroscopy. This is an X-linked mental retardation disorder thought to be second only to fragile X in prevalence.

Dr. Mark DiFrancesco, PhD

Assistant Professor of Radiology

Dr. Mark DiFrancesco, PhD

Dr. DiFrancesco is a physicist with degrees from Carnegie-Mellon University (BS) and the University of Pittsburgh (MS, PhD). After 15 years of experience in the commercial sector developing medical devices, he joined the IRC in the fall of 2004 to take advantage of an opportunity to train for research in advanced MR imaging and analysis. Recent research activity has included the use of concurrent EEG and fMRI to detect functional correlates of spontaneous brain activity, the study of the neurocognitive effects of Lupus using fMRI, applyiing functional imaging to investigate attentional deficits arising from sleep restriction in adolescents, and assessing the impact of field strength on the quality of small animal brain imaging.

Dr. Charles Dumoulin, PhD

Scientific Director of the Imaging Research Center, Professor of Radiology

Dr. Charles Dumoulin, PhD

Chuck Dumoulin received his BS in Chemistry from Florida State University in 1977 and his PhD degree in Analytical Chemistry in 1981. He then spent three years performing high-resolution NMR spectroscopy research at Syracuse University before moving to General Electric’s Research and Development Center in Niskayuna, NY, where he became part of the team that developed the first industrial prototype MR scanners. In the following 24 years, Chuck made major contributions to the fields of Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA), dynamic MRI and Interventional MRI (resulting in over 100 issued patents). In 2008 Chuck moved to Cincinnati and became the scientific director of the Imaging Research Center. His current research interests include MRI imaging of neonates, MR-guided Focused Ultrasound Ablation, and Interventional MR.

Randy Giaquinto

Senior RF Engineer - IRC

Randy Giaquinto

Randy Giaquinto joined the Imaging Research Center in 2010. Randy brings to the IRC several years experience in RF coil design, CAD, and fabrication skills. Randy was the principle coil designer for 30+ years at General Electric Global Research Center’s MR lab in Niskayuna, NY. Randy currently holds 16 patents and 60+ publications. Randy’s passion is designing cutting edge clinical RF coils, working in a clinical setting, and in the end, helping people. Previous designs included several four channel arrays in the 80’s, over a dozen 32 channel arrays in 2002-2006, some including; torso, cardiac, head, prostate, breast (.5mm isotropic resolution), and finally 128 channel coils (extremely low g-factor with extreme SNR), all world’s first efforts. Randy is excited about teaching the practical art of RF coils, and designing world-class pediatric arrays and coil systems to help the kids at Children’s.

Dr. Scott K. Holland, PhD

Professor of Radiology, Pediatrics, and Physics

Dr. Scott K. Holland, PhD

Scott Holland is a physicist by training with a B.S. degree (1980) in Physics from Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA. and M.S. (1982) and Ph.D. (1985) degrees in Engineering and Applied Science from Yale University. After a year (1985-86) as a Research Engineer with the Electromagnetic Sciences Laboratory at Stanford Research Institute (SRI International), Menlo Park, CA, Scott returned to the Yale School of Medicine as a post-doctoral fellow (1986-88) and later as an Assistant Professor (1988-94) of Diagnostic Radiology. He joined the faculty of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine in 1994 as Associate Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics and served as Scientific Director of the Imaging Research Center at Children’s Hospital Medical Center until 2003. His research currently focuses on pediatric neuroimaging applications of MRI at high field; including perfusion MRI, functional MRI, microimaging of transgenic mice, and image processing methods.

Dr. Gregory Lee, PhD

Assistant Professor of Radiology

Dr. Yu Li, PhD

Assistant Professor of Radiology

Dr. Yu Li, PhD

Yu Li completed his undergraduate education in Biomedical Engineering at the Tsinghua University, PR China. He received his MS and PhD degree in Electrical Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has 2 year postdoctoral training experience in Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Lab at the University of Florida, and 5 year industrial experience of clinical MRI coil design in Invivo Diagnostic Imaging at Philips HealthCare. Since 1998, Yu Li has been actively working in the research field of Magnetic Resonance. His major research includes microcoil array design for high-throughput spectroscopy, high sensitivity small-scale protein NMR spectroscopy at high fields, high field RF coil design for human MRI, high channel count RF coil array for parallel acquisition, and parallel imaging. His current research interest is the technological development and clinical applications of high speed MR imaging and spectroscopy using parallel acquisition.

Dr. Diana M. Lindquist, PhD

Assistant Professor of Radiology

Dr. Diana Lindquist, PhD

Diana M. Lindquist received BS degrees in Chemistry and Math from the University of New Mexico (1989), her MA in Physical Chemistry from Brandeis University (1991), and her PhD in Applied Science from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (1998), where she became a magnetic resonance physicist/spectroscopist. She was on the faculty at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences before being recruited to Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in 2006. She serves as the director for the In Vivo Microimaging Laboratory within the Imaging Research Center. Her research focuses on the metabolic effects of various pharmaceutical agents as measured by proton, phosphorus, and carbon magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Dr. Jean Tkach, PhD

Associate Professor of Radiology

Dr. Tkach received her undergraduate and graduate training in Biomedical Engineering. She received her BSE from Duke University and a Masters and Ph.D. from Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Tkach is an MRI physicist by training and she has been involved in MRI research since 1985. Upon completion of her Ph.D, Dr. Tkach joined the MRI Research and Development Group at Siemens Medical Systems. She left that position to assume the role of Head of MRI Research at the Cleveland Clinic. Prior to joining the CCHMC faculty in the Fall of 2010, Dr. Tkach was an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. Throughout her career, the majority of her effort has been dedicated to the development, implementation, optimization and application of novel MRI acquisition techniques to address clinical as well as more fundamental research questions. Dr. Tkach is working closely with researchers and clinicians at CCHMC to develop and implement MRI acquisition techniques optimized for and to best address the unique clinical needs of the neonate that exploit the new technology that is being developed by the engineers in the IRC.

Dr. Jennifer Vannest, PhD

Assistant Professor of Pediatrics

Dr. Jennifer Vannest, PhD

Dr. Vannest completed her undergraduate education at the Ohio State University and continued there for her graduate work. Her PhD (2001) is in Linguistics, and her graduate training also included background in Cognitive Psychology, Neuropsychology and Speech and Hearing Sciences. As a postdoctoral fellow at University of Michigan and University of Rochester, Dr. Vannest was trained to use functional MRI to study the brain mechanisms underlying language skill. She came to Cincinnati Children's in 2006, and her current research makes use of functional MRI and behavioral testing to examine how epilepsy and neurodevelopmental disorders affect language function, both in terms of language skill and brain circuitry that supports it. These studies are designed with the goal of better treatment and educational strategies for children with these disorders.

Dr. Janaka Wansapura, PhD

Assistant Professor of Radiology

Dr. Janaka Wansapura, PhD

Dr. Janaka Wansapura gained his BSc. (Hons.) degree in Physics from the University of Colombo, Sri Lanka. He obtained his Ph.D. degree in Physics from University of Cincinnati, OH and gained further training in MR imaging at Stanford University as a pot-doctoral fellow. Dr. Wansapura’s current research is focused on MR of imaging of familial cardiomyopathy in human and in transgenic animal models.

The majority of childhood cardiomyopathy has a genetic origin with mutations detected in genes encoding sarcomere, cytoskeletal, and nuclear proteins, as well as proteins involved with regulation of Ca2+ homoestasis. The mechanisms by which mutations eventually result in cardiomyopathy are complex and not yet totally resolved. While the disease process in the heart is underway at a young age, it is rare to detect clinically significant heart disease in the first decade of life. Consequently, cardiovascular manifestations of disease frequently go unrecognized until very advanced stages. Thus, in most instances cardiac therapy has been limited to the treatment of symptomatic heart failure at end stage disease. In order to improve clinical care and outcomes in these patients, a robust set of non-invasive markers that could not only distinguish genetic variants of cardiomyopathy but could also elucidate the pathogenesis of this disease is necessary. Dr. Wansapura’s research directly addresses this problem utilizing a range of MR methodologies including myocardial tagging, relaxation time mapping, delayed enhancement etc. Dr. Wansapura’s other research interests include vascular compliance, MR based thermometry and fat/water decomposition.

Dr. Patrick Winter, PhD

Assistant Professor of Radiology

Dr. Patrick Winter, PhD

Patrick Winter received his undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri and his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. Patrick returned to Washington University as a post-doc in 2000 and subsequently became an Assistant Professor of Medicine in 2005. He took a one-year leave of absence from his faculty position in 2008 to initiate clinical trials of an investigational MRI contrast agent with a small bio-technology company in St. Louis named Kereos. In 2010, he joined the Imaging Research Center. His current research interests include molecular imaging of cancer and cardiovascular disease, multi-nuclear imaging and spectroscopy, activatable MRI contrast agents, and automated image processing routines.

Dr. Weihong Yuan, PhD

Research Assistant Professor of Radiology/McLaurin Fellow in Neurosurgery

Dr. Weihong Yuan, PhD

Dr. Weihong Yuan was trained in biomedical engineering and received his B. S. degree (1991) from Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, and MS (1997) and Ph.D. (2000) from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Dr. Yuan came to the Imaging Research Center and started his neuroimaging post-doctoral fellowship training in April, 2004. In mid 2005, Dr. Yuan joined faculty of IRC/PNRC. Dr. Yuan’s current research interest is focused on diffusion tensor imaging in children with hydrocephalus. He is also interested in the application of various imaging technique (fMRI, DTI) in other pediatric patients, such as children with supratentorial tumor, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, spina bifida, etc.